Other

Why I Work At Camp

I had a reader contact me, and we got into a back and forth email conversation about why we work at camp. She wanted to stay anonymous but was happy to let me post her list.

I GET TO

TEACH OTHERS

I GET TO

TRY NEW THINGS

I GET TO

INSPIRE

I GET TO

BE INSPIRED

I GET TO

CREATE

I GET TO

EXPLORE

I GET TO

TURN WORK INTO PLAY

I GET TO

MENTOR

I GET TO

SING

I GET TO

ACT

I GET TO

DANCE

I GET TO

SPEND QUALITY TIME WITH FRIENDS, NEW and OLD

I GET TO

LAUGH EVERYDAY

I GET TO

BELIEVE IN MAGIC

I GET TO

TELL STORIES

I GET TO

ENJOY THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE

I GET TO

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

 

Why do YOU work at your job?

2 Comments

  • I am dependent on independence. Being involved in scouts since the age of seven has made me extremely independent and made me fearless to try new things. The past three summers, Boy Scout Camp has taught me freedom in a whole new way. I learned that not only do I have to be responsible for my own actions, but I also have to be an example and role model for the boys that I teach.
    Camp changed me. At 6:45 AM I slide the alarm bar across my iPhone. I put on my scout uniform with pride as I tuck in my staff shirt and pull my green socks up to my knee. I walk down to assembly where the color guard raises the flag and announces the day’s activities. I then lead troops and walk up to the dining hall the whole way singing songs with crazy motions. My favorite is the “Pizza Hut” song and jumping around when we get to the Carl’s Jr. verse. I get to the lake at 7:45 with my lesson plans and set out the canoes, row boats, kayaks and other equipment that we will need aces to throughout the day. The first period of scouts arrive and we review the safety and written requirements of the canoeing merit badge. After all of the campers have a basic understanding of strokes and techniques they need to know on the water. Then I send them out on a boat and direct them as well as lifeguard. Two hours later, a new batch of campers come for a rowing class where I teach them how to row and do rescues on land and out in the water. After lunch, classes start again; I get to the lake early to set up for my next set of classes. And a new group comes for a canoeing class, I go over the curriculum again, adding in games like “Simon says” to remember the parts of paddles or oars. It is extremely windy in the afternoon, so I go onto a kayak to assist in a deep water T-Rescue. During rowing class I explain how to do a deep water rescue and then leap off the dock and dive into the water. I then have each student demonstrate their skills. After dinner I go to set up for campfire, and then campers fill into the log benches and eagerly watch as all of the staff put on skits and sing songs.
    Camp means making a difference in kids’ lives. I once had a leader thank me crying and say that I was a memory-maker and he would never forget the positive impact I had on his son’s life. I like to take the lead. I feel very confident and comfortable being in leadership positions, it comes second nature to me. I have demonstrated this quality through Girl Scouts where I have earned my Bronze and Silver Awards. I am currently working on my Gold Award, the girl equivalent to Eagle Scout.

    • Nice. Thank you for sharing that, Lauren. I can tell that camp and Scouts has, and continues to, make a huge impact on you. That’s AWESOME!

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